Mount Pleasant Community Art Screen (MPCAS)

MPCAS

PLACE: An introduction from Program Director Glenn Alteen

The new Mount Pleasant Community Art Screen will be an outdoor, 4 x 7-meter urban screen located on The Independent building. Kingsway at Broadway, Vancouver.

grunt gallery’s Mount Pleasant Community Art Screen ’s inaugural exhibition PLACE
 looks at a changing Mount Pleasant and Vancouver, through works that explore its history, it current vitality and its future through the interpretations of artists and 
residents who live here.

Our vision is to create and implement programming that reflects cultural interests,
 and that allows for opportunities for direct community engagement in a variety of innovative ways.

 Mount Pleasant was one of Vancouver’s earliest neighbourhoods; it was THE place to be
 from the 1890s until 1910 when the Shaughnessy neighbourhood then became the new preferred
 district to be and Mount Pleasant fell into decline. Mount Pleasant and Brewery Creek
lay close to the Ontario Street dividing line between east and west and Main Street
 reflected this cultural and class division, with bigger homes to the west (Shaughnessy) and working-class homes to the east (Mount Pleasant).

Mount Pleasant’s early decline continued for almost 100 years! Its working-class roots 
made it the place for rental housing and transient tenants, and it became the poorest 
neighbourhood outside of the DTES (downtown eastside). A neighbourhood of immigrants, urban poor and
 artists created the conditions from where much of Vancouver’s early cultural life grew.

Beginning in the 1990s, Mount Pleasant’s gentrification started to take hold, first through
 the live/work studio condos that gradually began to appear in the area. Beginning in
 2010, with the development in the Olympic Village area, serious gentrification began,
 with many residents evicted from their long-held homes as rents doubled and tripled
 within a few years. Suddenly the things that held Mount Pleasant back seemed to be its
 new selling points, like its arts community and old heritage buildings. Ironically, both became
 early targets in the process. Suddenly Mount Pleasant transformed from one of Vancouver ’s cheapest 
neighbourhood to one of its most expensive! It became ground zero for the increasing unaffordability of the city.

As we begin the process of building a program that reflects, engages with and enriches this
 complex cultural history, our call for submissions welcomes contributions from community members. Topics could include (but are not limited to), identity, language, housing, city streets, food, neighbourhoods, histories, memories, potential futures and displacement.

___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

How To Submit Your Work

The deadline for submissions is ongoing. In your submission please include the following:

1) Maximum one-page proposal, describing what you wish to show, and how it relates to PLACE.

2) Supporting Documentation: Video submissions should be sent as a link to a host site (Youtube, Vimeo).
3) Photography and media arts submissions: 10-12 images. Image files should be no more than 1200 pixels wide.
4) CV and a short biography
5) Artist Statement (optional)

For more information or to email submissions please contact: Kate Barry

screencoordinator (at) grunt (dot) ca

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Mount Pleasant Community Art Screen

grunt gallery’s new Mount Pleasant Community Art Screen (MPCAS) is an outdoor 4×7 metre LED screen featuring art-only content by and for the Mount Pleasant community, located at Kingsway & Broadway in Vancouver on the east side of the Independent building. Stay tuned for the launch date, coming very soon!

Our inaugural program, PLACE, looks at a changing Mount Pleasant and Vancouver through works by artists, curators and residents who live here, exploring the area’s history, its current vitality and its future.

Mount Pleasant was one of Vancouver’s earliest neighbourhoods. It was the place to be in the 1890s, but in 1910 Shaughnessy became the new preferred neighbourhood, and Mount Pleasant fell into decline. Mount Pleasant and Brewery Creek lie close to the Ontario Street dividing line between Vancouver’s east and west. Main Street reflected this cultural and class division, with bigger homes to the west and working-class homes to the east. Mount Pleasant’s early decline continued for almost 100 years. Its working-class roots made it the place for rental housing and transient tenants, and it became the poorest neighbourhood outside of the downtown east side (DTES). A neighbourhood of immigrants, urban poor and artists created the conditions from which much of Vancouver’s early cultural life grew.

Beginning in the 1990s, Mount Pleasant’s gentrification started to take hold, first through the live/work studio condos that gradually began to appear in the area. In 2010, with the development in the Olympic Village area, serious gentrification began, with many residents evicted from their long-held homes as rents doubled and tripled within a few years. Suddenly the things that had held Mount Pleasant back seemed to be its new selling points—such as its arts community and old heritage buildings—although ironically both became early targets in the gentrification process. Mount Pleasant quickly transformed from one of Vancouver’s cheapest neighbourhoods to one of its most expensive, becoming ground zero for the increasing unaffordability of the city.

Our vision is to provide an urban screen that allows the viewer to interact in various ways with the content, in contrast to the advertising/ consumer paradigm that is the rule with most highly visible screens in a public space. By bringing together over fifty artists, community members, and community festivals, MPCAS will present newly commissioned artwork, photography, video, time-based media, animation, performance, interactive art, digital art, GIFs, super 8 film, storytelling and much more, capturing what it means to live in an ever-changing Mount Pleasant neighbourhood.

 

How To Submit Your Work:

The deadline for submissions is ongoing. In your submission please include the following:

1) Maximum one-page proposal, describing what you wish to show and how it relates to PLACE.

2) Supporting Documentation: Video submissions should be sent as a link to a host site (Youtube, Vimeo).
3) Photography and media arts submissions: 10-12 images. Image files should be no more than 1200 pixels wide.
4) CV and a short biography
5) Artist Statement (optional)

For more information or to email submissions please contact Kate Barry: screencoordinator(at)grunt(dot)ca

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Digital Stories

Upcoming Fall 2019 Workshops:
Sunday, October 20, 1-5PM
Sunday, October 27, 1-5PM
Sunday, November 17, 1-5PM
Sunday, November 24, 1-5PM

Location: grunt gallery, #116 – 350 East 2 Avenue, Vancouver, BC

This Fall, grunt gallery and EastVan Digital Stories join forces once again with Mount Pleasant and Vancouver residents who wish to create short videos around the theme of PLACE. Artists Lorna Boschman and Sebnem Ozpeta will host a series of five, free, weekly workshops at grunt gallery that walk participants through the process of digital story making!

Through the digital stories group process, you will be able to create and share your own authentic story by combining digital photos and/or video. Selected videos from the workshops will be shown on grunt gallery’s Mount Pleasant Community Art Screen and on digitalstories.ca.

To sign up, please choose one day (from the dates listed above), include one alternative date in case your first choice of the workshop is filled.

Send an email to Lorna Boschman: lorna (at) digitalstories (dot) ca

In the email include your name, email address, phone/text number, and whether you live in Mount Pleasant or Vancouver. Please include one, or two, sentences about why you would like to create a short digital story. Lorna will send you a list of things you must bring to the workshop including several photos (from your phone or camera) and/or video that directly relates to your story’s theme.

Workshops fill up quickly, and a maximum of four people can register per weekly workshop!

Special thanks to the Vancouver Foundation who made this project possible.

Vancouver Foundation is dedicated to creating healthy, vibrant and livable communities across BC. Since 1943, our donors have created 1,800 endowment funds and together we have distributed more than $1 billion to charities. From arts and culture to the environment, health and social development, education, medical research and more, we exist to make meaningful and lasting improvements to communities in BC.

Image credit: Isaac Forsland, Off the Map, Digital Story, 2019.

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Projects

CURRENT PROJECTS:

Mount Pleasant Community Arts Screen
grunt gallery’s new Mount Pleasant Community Art Screen (MPCAS) is an outdoor 4×7 metre LED screen featuring art-only content by and for the Mount Pleasant community, located at Kingsway & Broadway in Vancouver on the east side of the Independent building. Stay tuned for the launch date, coming very soon!

The Blue Cabin Floating Artist Residency
In 2015, two celebrated Canadian artists, the late Al Neil and his partner, Carole Itter, were evicted from their studio home, a small cabin that had been sitting in a secluded cove on the Tsleil-Waututh territory foreshore near Cates Park since 1932. Over the course of 4 years, a consortium of arts organizations came together to save the cabin and transform it into The Blue Cabin Floating Artist Residency. The Blue Cabin floated into Vancouver’s False Creek this summer and launched its inaugural program of artist residencies, open houses, talks and workshops. Situated in the unceded lands and waters of the xwməθkwəy̓əm (Musqueam), Skwxwú7mesh (Squamish) and Səl̓ílwətaʔ/Selilwitulh (Tsleil-Waututh) Nations, the Blue Cabin is international in scope but deeply rooted in the histories and narratives of this place, offering a unique opportunity to learn, explore and engage with the foreshore.

Wordless – The Performance Art of Rebecca Belmore
A beautiful new print publication examining the performance work of Canadian artist Rebecca Belmore, that brings together documentation of Belmore’s 30-year career, as well as generating a series of new work based on her past performance. This project feeds into grunt’s long-term interest in performance art, archives and support of Rebecca Belmore’s work. This project also included an exhibition of new photographs by Belmore, nindinawemaganidog (all of my relations), and the re-deisgn of Belmore’s website. Wordless: The Performance Art of Rebecca Belmore is now available via our online bookstore.

Spark: Fireside Artist Talk Series
January 2016 – Present
A series of informal artist talks hosted by the Native Education College (NEC) in partnership with grunt gallery.  These informal talks feature Indigenous artists whose work spans media from the two-dimensional to live performance and beyond.  Their works fuse traditional cultural knowledge with contemporary art forms, pose urgent political questions, and push the boundaries of how we think about art, history and culture more broadly.  Join us over the lunch hour to be inspired by these artists in the NEC’s longhouse!

Digital Stories
For Fall 2019, grunt gallery and EastVan Digital Stories join forces once again with Mount Pleasant and Vancouver residents who wish to create short videos around the theme of PLACE. Artists Lorna Boschman and Sebnem Ozpeta will host a series of six, free, weekly workshops at grunt gallery that walk participants through the process of digital story making!

Recollective: Vancouver Independent Archives Week
Multiple events take place from November 1-13, 2018 as a series of free public events, panels, conversations, and screenings that highlight artist-run centre archives, artists working with archives, and the intersections between contemporary art practices and social movements in Vancouver. Recollective is presented in partnership with Western Front, 221A, VIVO Media Arts, The Morris and Helen Belkin Art Gallery, Artspeak, and Rungh Magazine. This series is the first part of a robust two-year program that will include presentations from international contexts to take place throughout 2019. All presentation documentation and accompanying critical responses by writers, artists, activists, and others will be published on archivesweek.ca as a research resource for wider and remote audiences.


PAST PROJECTS:

2019

Particles: Seoul to Vancouver
Particles continues grunt’s partnership with organizations and artists in Seoul, South Korea. This international program began in Seoul in 2018 with Instant Coffee’s project Pink Noise Pop Up and continues with an artist residency, an exhibition and a curatorial tour in Vancouver this May. Event information is below.

Together Apart 
Together Apart was envisioned as a way of making and holding space for 2SQ/Indigiqueer folks to come together and to be in dialogue with one another so that we might centre the conversations we’d like to hear or that we feel have been absent in our communities. However, our intentions were also simple: to celebrate and enjoy one another’s creativity and dedication to our practices, and to recognize one another in such a way that speaks across the distances we experience in our living and movement through our worlds.


2018

Pink Noise Pop Up
March – April 2018
A series of events that expands the relationship between the arts communities in Vancouver and Seoul, Pink Noise Pop Up seeks to highlight the ways that art interacts with the often complex social and economic conditions of the city. Based in the work of Canadian arts collective Instant Coffee, this exhibition includes installations, artist editions, performances and other collaborations that will take place in South Korea.

The Making of An Archive
Summer 2017 – Spring 2018
Jacqueline Hoàng Nguyễn’s project, The Making of an Archive, seeks to collect images of everyday life photographed by Canadian immigrants, in a direct, collective and exploratory approach.


2017

Journey to Kaho’olawe
May 25 – 30, 2017
Journey to Kaho’olawe is an artist publication by Hans Winkler and T’uy’t-tanat Cease Wyss. The book is the result of a four year process centred on the Hawaiian Island of Kaho’olawe, a sacred site to the Hawaiians in recovery after being occupied as a practice range by the American military. Returned to the Hawaiians in the 1990s, the island is being remediated and returned to its natural state. In conjunction with the launch of the publication grunt gallery and the artists present a week long series of events celebrating Kaho’olawe and the Kanaka presence in BC.

Spring Fever: Vancouver Independent Archives 2017
March 18 – April 8, 2017
This spring season, Vancouver Independent Archives will offer a series of free public talks, screenings and community workshops that foreground local art and art history by drawing on the archives of Vancouver’s independent arts community. Building on the success of Vancouver Independent Archives Week 2015, Spring Fever invites new partner artists, scholars, and organizations to share their approach toward and practice within the archive.

Intertextual
What’s At Stake? Intertextual Indigenous Knowledges is an afternoon of talks, panels and a spoken word performance which examines knowledge, power, authority, and sovereignty in the construction of artistic practices. The event follows from Intertextual: Art in Dialogue, a roving reading group that was held at participating galleries over the last year.


2016

Shako Club
A series of workshops in the Tonari Gumi kitchen and studio space around concepts of wellness, care and food where culinary “sculptures” were constructed, incorporating aspects of stories, ideas and wellness philosophies. By artist Cindy Mochizuki and members from Tonari Gumi.

Past and Presence: NEC Mural Project
The Native Education College and grunt gallery are partnering with Vancouver-based First Nations artists Corey Bulpitt, Sharifah Marsden and Jerry Whitehead to create a mural celebrating NEC’s 30 years in Mount Pleasant.

Cutting Copper: Indigenous Resurgent Practice
A collaborative project between grunt gallery and the Belkin Art Gallery, aiming to bring together a cross-disciplinary group of artists, curators, writers, educators, scholars, students, and activists to explore the embodied theory of Indigenous resurgence and cultural representation – both from the perspectives of their own disciplines and one another’s.


2015

Terminus: Archives, Ephemera, and Electronic Art
This workshop was a part of the 2015 International Symposium on Electronic Art (ISEA).  Organized by the Ethnographic Terminalia Collective in collaboration with Tarah Hogue and Glenn Alteen.

FutureLoss
Space, on Main Street and in Vancouver, is currency, and artist Zoe Kreye’s practice reaches through the overarching narratives of real estate, gentrification and speculation to consider the poetics of an individual’s connection to place.


2014

MAINSTREETERS: Taking Advantage, 1972–1982
The history of a gang of Vancouver artists who lived and worked together in drama, excess, friendship and grief.

30th Anniversary
Thirty years is a long time.  A retrospective of all that is (and was) grunt gallery.

Play, Fall, Rest, Dance
The artist works with children with disabilities to emphasize the state of making and being, the pursuit of uninhibited creative exploration that is void of rules, structures and concepts of ‘right or wrong’ and ‘perfection vs. mistakes’. Children are enabled with artistic autonomy and the artist thoughtfully guides them to explore their creative processes.  By artist Valerie Salez.

gruntCraft
A youth engagement pilot program developed to bridge the creative work being done by youth in the popular online video game Minecraft and artistic inquiry at grunt gallery.


2013

ThisPlace Vancouver
Rethinking ideas about Vancouver’s identity and history, this project attempted to compile a collaborative archive in order to expand the collective awareness of the city’s narratives.


2009

Vancouver Art in the Sixties: Ruins in Process
A digital archive of artwork, ephemera, and film.


2008

Nikamon Ohci Askiy (songs because of the land)
In December 2008, artist Cheryl L’Hirondelle made daily journeys throughout Vancouver and “sung” the landscape she encountered.

Beat Nation
Hip Hop as Indigenous culture.

The Medicine Project
Aboriginal notions of medicine and how they influence the lives of First Nations people and artists today.


2006

First Vision
Two worlds – curated by Tania Willard.


2005 – 2009

Brunt Magazine
Showcasing the artists exhibited at grunt gallery, brunt magazine is a complement to the exhibitions and a closer look at the artists, their processes, and the ideas that inspire their work.

 

 

 

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Staff & Board

STAFF

Program Directors – Glenn Alteen & Vanessa Kwan
glenn@grunt.ca
vanessakwan@grunt.ca

Operations Director – Meagan Kus
meagan@grunt.ca

Archives Manager – Dan Pon
dan@grunt.ca

Communications Manager – Katrina Orlowski
communications@grunt.ca

MPCAS Coordinator – Kate Barry
screencoordinator@grunt.ca

Project Coordinator for Recollective – Emma Metcalfe Hurst
emma@grunt.ca

Curatorial Intern – Whess Harman
whess@grunt.ca

Curatorial Intern – Nellie Lamb
nellie@grunt.ca

Blue Cabin
info@thebluecabin.ca

CONTRACT STAFF

Mary Ann Anderson – Consultant/Grant Writing
Linda Gorrie – Business Manager
Sébastien Aubin – Graphic Designer
Hedy Wood – Gallery Assistant
Hillary Wood – Editing
Charlie Stableford – Installation
Kay Slater – Exhibitions Manager
Jessica Fletcher – Digitization Assistant
Archer Pechawis – Web and Digital Publications Designer
Merle Addison – Performance and Event Photography
Dennis Ha – Installation Photography

BOARD

[expand title=”Karen Kazmer: President”]
Karen Kazmer, a practising visual artist, works with a diverse range of materials in her sculpture, installations and public art. She received her BFA from UBC and her MFA from York University. She is a part-time instructor at Emily Carr University of Art + Design. Her work has been exhibited in group and solo shows in Canada and the United States. Recently, a public commission, Moving Up was completed for the new Spirit Trail in North Vancouver.
[/expand]

[expand title=”Jessie Caryl: Vice President”]
Jessie Caryl is a lawyer whose background is in historical research, writing, and curatorial practice. She has an M.A. in Art History (Critical and Curatorial Studies) (UBC), an Hon. B.A. in Art and Art History (University of Toronto) and a diploma in Fine Art from Sheridan College.
[/expand]

[expand title=”Fiona Mowatt: Interm Treasurer”]
Fiona Mowatt is a practising visual artist & arts educator based in Vancouver BC. A graduate of Emily Carr University of Art & Design, her first solo exhibition was at the grunt gallery in 1993 and she has been involved with the gallery ever since. As a senior educator at the Vancouver Art Gallery, and a former instructor at Arts Umbrella, she has many years of experience developing & teaching curriculum, working collaboratively and conducting public tours & workshops for both youth groups & audiences of all ages.
[/expand]

[expand title=”Osvaldo Ramirez Castillo”]
Born in El Salvador, Castillo immigrated to Canada in 1989 at the age of 11. He attended the Ontario College of Art and Design (Toronto 1998-2001) and received an MFA from Concordia University (2004-2007). A previous resident of Montreal, Castillo relocated to Vancouver in 2013.
[/expand]

[expand title=”Shannon Leddy”]
Shannon Leddy (Metis) is a Vancouver based writer and educator. Her PhD research at Simon Fraser University focused on inviting pre-service teachers into dialogue with contemporary Indigenous art as a mechanism of decolonizing education and in order to help them become adept at delivering Indigenous education without reproducing colonial stereotypes.  She now holds a position in the Faculty of Education at UBC and continues to focus on working with pre-service teachers in improving their practices in Indigenous education. As a former high school art teacher, Shannon excited to be working with grunt gallery and to keeping her hand in the arts.
[/expand]

[expand title=”Gizem Sozen”]
Gizem Sozen is a PhD student at the Political Science Program with a concentration in Cultural, Social and Political Thought at the University of Victoria. She received her BA in Sociology from Koc University, Istanbul in 2009 and her MA in the Social and Political Thought Program from York University, Toronto, in 2012. After her MA, she gained a Diploma in Art History from the University of British Columbia, Vancouver. Her research interests are situated at the intersections of social and political thought and history of art and aesthetics.
[/expand]

[expand title=”Lanna Last”]
Lanna Last is currently in the second year of the MA in Art History, Theory and Visual Arts program at UBC. In 2015, she graduated from the Diploma program in Art History and, in 2012, she completed her BA in English Literature. She has experience at Index-The Swedish Contemporary Art Foundation in Stockholm, Sweden where she worked with the director and curator on exhibitions focusing on political strife in Sweden. Her academic research mainly focuses on photography in Northern Africa during the 19th century.
[/expand]

 

 

 

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