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Three Indigenous Project Sites

grunt gallery wishes you a happy Aboriginal Day!

grunt has a rich history of working with indigenous artists, check out some of these project sites that archive text, images, video and more.

1) Indian Acts: Aboriginal Performance Art
A website that grunt gallery curated for Activating the Archives, it chronicles a performance art conference that took place in Vancouver in 2002.
Check out essay’s written by Tania Willard, Dana Claxton, Daina Warren, Archer Pechawis and more…

 

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2) Nikamon Ohci Askiy (songs because of the land)

In December 2008, artist Cheryl L’Hirondelle made daily journeys throughout Vancouver and “sung” the landscape she encountered. These encounters were captured by mobile phone by the artist and whatever other technologies are made available by participating viewers/audience (video, photo, audio). Check out this interactive website that includes sound bites from L’Hirondelle’s recordings.

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3) Beat Nation

The little exhibition that could. Some might not realize the humble beginnings of Beat Nation and how it began as a youth project website between grunt gallery and Native Youth Artist Collective. Check out the website that was originally created in 2009, the amount of emerging artists who have since built tremendous careers is inspiring.

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Check out all of grunt’s project websites here.

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Al Neil and Carole Itter’s Cabin: grunt gallery Field Trip

grunt gallery decided to take a field trip to Cate’s Cove to visit Al Neil and Carole Itter’s cabin. Other than Glenn, most of the staff had never visited the little shack located off the water. We first stopped at the bird sanctuary where Ken Lum’s from shangri-la to shangri-la is installed, despite the woods dwarfing the size of the shacks, they are bigger than one might think. By the way, one of these shacks reference Tom Burrows old cabin, he currently has an exhibition at the Belkin.

We then continued up the road to Cate’s Park where Glenn Alteen guided us down a little known path towards the cabin.

Considering all of the media attention the cabin has received recently and the efforts from Glenn and the gang at grunt to help increase much needed attention about this amazing piece of history, it was really important for all of the staff to actually visit the site and get a feeling of what that area was all about.

This is a sort of evolving sculpture, apparently when the King Tide occurred in December, the water rose to the platform of the cabin but luckily pieces from this work remained intact.

The cabin is a single room and it’s heated by a wood stove, it’s entirely made of wood and includes a small kitchen, a living room area, a piano and a bedroom space at the far end.

If you want to keep up with what’s happening with the cabin, ‘like’ the Facebook page here.

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grunt Celebrates 30 years!

coasters imagektichen imagegrowlers image

grunt gallery is grateful and excited to have reached our Kickstarter goal, raising more than $10,000 for our 30th anniversary celebrations. If you missed out on pledging, you can still pick up a number of our special edition perks.

Growlers are available for purchase at Brassneck Brewery ($7) and at grunt gallery.  Fill up your growler at a local Vancouver brewery and share it with friends. Purchase one as a gift for loved ones approaching the upcoming holiday season.

Pick up a set of quirky letter-pressed ovoid-shaped coasters through grunt gallery’s online shop or stop by grunt gallery to pick them up! You can also stop by a number of neighbourhood restaurants to pick up a free coaster via our weekly coaster series. Gift them to your friends, these vibrantly coloured coasters looking stunning as a framed set.

Stop by grunt gallery in December for special events related to our current exhibition, Kitchen. Artist Julia Feyrer has delved within grunt’s history and archives and continues to work on an installation in the main space of our gallery. Save the date for the following get-togethers:

>Friday, December 5th: Drawing 7pm
>Tuesday, December 9th: Performance 7pm
>Friday, December 12th: Recording 7pm
>Friday, December 19th: Solstice Party

Read the first exhibition text written by curator Vanessa Kwan, here.

Interested in what grunt has planned over the upcoming months? Make sure you sign up for our e-newsletter to stay in the loop.


>> Learn more about our 30th anniversary
>> Social Objects: Coasters & Growlers
>> Events

 

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BREW: 30 Years of grunt gallery

This is a big year for grunt gallery and we’ve got a lot brewing: we’re celebrating our 30th anniversary! Raise a glass and take a moment with us to celebrate what we’ve accomplished.

Founded in 1984, we know there’s a lot to celebrate! Thirty years is a long time and it’s time to proudly commemorate the institution we’ve become over these last three decades. Yeah, we said institution. Becoming what we are today did not come easy. It happened over many cups of coffee and numerous bottles of beer. Our vision continues with the generous input and support from people like you. This year, we’re hosting a series of events and projects relating to our 30th anniversary. These include…

Click here to donate:

URL: https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/1687768919/brew-grunt-gallerys-30th-anniversary


>> About the 30th Anniversary
>> 30th Events
>> Social Objects
>> Donate

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grunt Board // David Khang: Wrong Places

David Khang is a board member at grunt gallery. Check out his upcoming exhibition in Toronto, Ontario.


Wrong Place / Mauvais Endroit / Lugar Incorrecto /틀린 장소

UPCOMING exhibition @ A Space Gallery
401 Richmond St., Suite 110, Toronto Ontario, M5V 3A8, (416)979-9633, Tuesday to Friday, 11-5, Saturday 12-5.

Exhibition: May 16 – June 14, 2014
Opening reception: Friday May 16, 6 – 8pm
; Performance: 7pm

Exhibition essay by Dina Al-Kassim

Wrong Place / Mauvais Endroit / Lugar Incorrecto /틀린 장소 is an ongoing series of site-specific public works that are performative.
By researching geopolitical histories, seemingly disparate political events are ‘remixed’ – cross-culturally and linguistically. Performed in various international sites – Nicosia (Cyprus), Santiago (Chile), Valdivia (Chile), Mexico City (Mexico), Edmonton and Montréal – each iteration centres on an iconic public speech, which is translated, then enunciated in multiple languages.

The result, at once dissonant and consonant, is intended to question our historic amnesia, and to trigger a re-imagining of their historical interconnectedness and continuing relevance to contemporary culture and geopolitics. At A Space Gallery, the work becomes a multimedia installation based on the original performances: painted military fatigue, flag-like photographs, a bicycle-powered mini-tank, and videodocumentation of the original site-specific performances.

David Khang’s Website.

David Khang, Latitude 53, Visualeyez 2008
Tank_Tryptich
WrongPlacesWrong Place / Mauvais Endroit / Lugar Incorrecto / 틀린 장소 2014

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An Image On An Image: A conversation with Marcus Bowcott [ATA article]

A raw steak must be among the least likely of things you’d expect to find in a cardboard box of papers. But that’s exactly what myself and another volunteer found, to our surprise, during an afternoon of work on grunt’s archive a couple of weeks ago. We discovered that the uncannily realistic-looking steak had formed part of a mid-nineties grunt exhibition called Palimpsest, and when the artist behind it, Marcus Bowcott, happened to stop in a few days later, it seemed only natural to catch up with him to discuss his art, personal philosophy, and what he’s doing now.

I took a rainy-day journey out to visit the artist in his studio in peaceful North Vancouver – a town that Bowcott’s long-time partner, Helene, describes as a “bedroom community, separated from agriculture, industry, entertainment”– an exemplification of the separation in the modern world of the facets of our lives, the way in which we work, eat, play and sleep in locations far removed from one another.

The modernization of the human experience is clearly something of combined terror and fascination to Bowcott. As we sipped on tea provided by Helene, who Bowcott describes as “a partner, in so many ways, in developing my work,” the artist described to me a recent trip down to Seattle, during which he was struck by “just the number of cars on the highway… The automobile is gobbling up energy.”

The automobile, in its used-up state as compacted refuse, has been a recurring theme in Bowcott’s work for some time. The painting exhibited at Bowcott’s grad show from London’s Royal College of Art featured wrecked and compacted cars, and since then, he’s explored the theme in sculpture, notably in a piece, 25 Standard Stoppages, currently being featured at Seattle’s Punch Gallery as part of a show, curated by Rock Hushka, titled Whither the American Dream?. He’s also developing a massively scaled-up version of the sculpture for Vancouver’s upcoming Sculpture Biennale, although, as he wryly comments, “people don’t want to show wrecked cars.”

“The bull doesn’t look that big here [in the photo] but he was 1200 pounds, and the whole gallery became like a manger… There were tons of people packed in there, but all of a sudden you’re honoring this animal, something that is often considered to be below us.”

The wrecked cars in question provide Bowcott with a vehicle to examine modern industry and its often unexamined aftermath. He titled a handful of these sculptures Das Kapital, which he explains as “a reference to our surplus capital, our surplus value/goods…which I’m presenting here as wrecked cars”, a leftover of the industrial process upon which most of us will never lay our eyes.

Another, perhaps more tragic, forgotten leftover of the industrial process was featured in Bowcott’s Palimpsest, the show that, years later, would inspire this article. Something amazing was accomplished in addition to the hyper-realistic steak sculptures and paintings of packaged steaks: for one night, the gallery was emptied of breakable artworks, and a live bull was brought in to inhabit the space. Marcus and Helene evocatively described what it was like to experience such a surreal coming-together of incongruities –

“The bull doesn’t look that big here [in the photo] but he was 1200 pounds, and the whole gallery became like a manger… There were tons of people packed in there, but all of a sudden you’re honoring this animal, something that is often considered to be below us. The cave painting [which was projected onto the bull’s body as part of the show] had much to do with feeding people. They were honoring the animal…and today we just shop for meat. We all had to be really quiet to keep it calm; that kind of hush was a really interesting addition to the installation and performance.”

“We live atomized lives,” Helene continues. “With technology, people become more and more isolated from each other. The same thing happens with food production. In many different aspects of our life…we are becoming more and more specialized.”

A critique or exploration of that atomization could be seen to run through Bowcott’s work as a unifying thread, perhaps in a sense of superimposition, of “stacking, or layering,” Helene tells me. “Even Palimpsest, the word, has to do with layering… An image on an image,” she says. A cave painting projected on the side of a bull. Crushed cars on top of cars on top of cars.

Visit Marcus Bowcott’s website.


About Genevieve Michaels:


Genevieve is studying art history and creative writing at the University of British Columbia. She has been volunteering at grunt since last October, writing and assisting with maintenance and digitization of the archives. She also writes about music and city life for local magazine Beatroute BC. Follow her on twitter: @LavenderIndigo0

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