Spark: Fireside Artist Talks

January 13th, 2016 by

Spark: A Fireside Artist Talk feat. Bracken Hanuse Corlett

Thursday, September 29, 2016
Native Education College
285 East 5th Avenue
12:15 – 1:00 pm

Bracken Hanuse Corlett_Headshot

grunt gallery presents Spark: Fireside Artist Talks at the Native Education College on the 3rd Thursday of every month (approximately) from 12:15 pm – 1:00 pm.

This informal lunch-hour talk is hosted by a series of artists who push at the boundaries of the traditional and the contemporary. How do their creations offer insight into broader issues that Indigenous people are faced with in the world today? What sorts of barriers or challenges exist for these artists? What strategies do they use to overcome these challenges?

OPEN TO THE PUBLIC

This recurring event is always FREE, and all are welcome to attend. Bring your own lunch or purchase from the NEC’s small canteen.

Bracken Hanuse Corlett is an interdisciplinary artist hailing from the Wuikinuxv and Klahoose Nations. He began working in theatre and performance 16 years ago, before transitioning to a practice that fuses digital-media, audio-visual performance, writing, painting, sculpture and drawing. His work combines traditional Indigenous iconography and history with new media and concepts that exist within cyclical space.

He is the co-founder of the Vancouver Indigenous Media Arts Festival. Over the last five years he has performed across the country as a member of the audio-visual collective Skookum Sound System and currently in the DJ/VJ duo See Monsters. He is a graduate of the En’owkin Centre of Indigenous Art and went to Emily Carr University of Art and Design for a B.F.A. in Visual Arts. He has also studied Northwest Coast art, carving and design from acclaimed Heiltsuk artists Bradley Hunt and his sons Shawn Hunt and Dean Hunt.

Some of his notable exhibitions, performances and screenings have been at grunt gallery, the Museum of Anthropology, Unit PITT Projects, Vancouver International Film Festival (Vancouver), Three Walls Gallery (Chicago), Ottawa International Animation Festival, SAW Gallery (Ottawa), Royal BC Museum, Open Space (Victoria), Winnipeg Art Gallery, Urban Shaman (Winnipeg), Sâkêwêwak Artists’ Collective, Mackenzie Art Gallery (Regina), Atlantic Film Festival, Tidal Force – Independent Media Arts Alliance (Halifax), Art Mur, Sommets du Cinéma D’animation (Montreal), ImagineNative, Toronto International Film Festival, Music Gallery (Toronto).

RSVP to the Facebook event here.

 

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Spark: A Fireside Artist Talk feat. Amanda Strong

Thursday, April 21, 2016
Native Education College
285 East 5th Avenue
12:15 – 1:00 pm

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FEATURED TOPIC

Hierarchy vs. Community: remodeling the processes and labels in film and animation.

ARTIST BIO

Amanda Strong is a Michif filmmaker, media artist and stop motion director currently based out of the unceded Coast Salish territory also known as Vancouver. She is the owner and director of Spotted Fawn Productions, an animation and media-based studio creating short films, commercial projects and workshops. A labour of love, Amanda’s productions collaborate with a diverse and talented group of artists putting emphasis on support and training women and Indigenous artists.

Amanda’s work explores ideas of blood memory and Indigenous ideology. Her background in photography, illustration and media extend into her award-winning stop motion animations. Her films Indigo and Mia’ challenge conventional structures of storytelling in cinema and have screened internationally, most notably at Cannes, TIFF, VIFF, and Ottawa International Animation Festival. Amanda has received numerous grants from the Canada Council for the Arts, Ontario Arts Council and the NFB. In 2013, Amanda was the recipient K.M. Hunter Artist Award for Film and Video, and most recently the recipient of the Vancouver Mayors Arts Awards for Emerging Film and Media Artist. Amanda is currently working on her latest short animation Four Faces of the Moon for CBC Short Docs. The story is told in four chapters, exploring the reclamation of language and Nationhood, while peeling back the layers of Canada’s colonial history, revealing Canada’s extermination agenda on the buffalo.

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grunt gallery presents Spark: Fireside Artist Talks at the Native Education College on the 3rd Thursday of every month from 12:15 to 1:00 pm.

This informal lunchtime talk is hosted by a series of artists who push at the boundaries of the traditional and the contemporary. How do their creations offer insight into broader issues that Indigenous people are faced with in the world today? What sorts of barriers or challenges exist for these artists? What strategies do they use to overcome these challenges?

OPEN TO THE PUBLIC

This recurring event is always FREE, and all are welcome to attend. Bring your own lunch or purchase from the NEC’s small canteen.

> Check out Amanda’s website
> link to Facebook event

 

Spark: A Fireside Artist Talk feat. Cease Wyss & Hans Winkler

Thursday, April 7, 2016
Native Education College
285 East 5th Avenue
12:15 – 1:00 pm

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Join us for a BONUS EDITION of Spark: A Fireside Artist Talk series, usually held the 3rd Thursday of every month.

This recurring event is always FREE, and all are welcome to attend. Bring your own lunch or purchase from the NEC’s small canteen.

Archeological evidence suggests that Hawaiians came to the island of Kaho‘olawe as early as 400 A.D., and settled in small fishing villages along the island’s coast. For hundreds of years, Kaho‘olawe served as a navigational center, the site of an adze quarry, an agricultural center, and a site for religious and cultural ceremonies.

But as modern times rolled in, Kaho‘olawe began to undergo a harsh evolution. It would be used as a penal colony to exile prisoners from the general populace, for sheep and cattle ranching, until World War II when the island was occupied by the US military from 1942 – 1990 as a training zone for bomb testing and air warfare technology.

Sustained protest by the Hawaiian population and eventual litigation forced an end to the bombing, and after a 10-year period of artillery removal, control was transferred back to the state of Hawaii in 2003. The island is currently uninhabitable and accessible only to Native Polynesians, strictly within the context of cultural or spiritual purposes, restoration, planting work, and re-vegetation.

Hans Winkler gained access to the restricted island in 2013 and in 2014 Cease Wyss joined him to explore the possibilities of artistic projects. In this talk they discuss their experiences and plans for their projects. Wyss will discuss her project “Kanaka Ranch to Kaho’olawe Island: Ephemeral Canoe Art” which explores similarities between Hawaiian and West Coast BC canoe cultures, while Winkler will present “Zero Zone” his mapping project of the island.

FEATURED ARTISTS:

T’uy’t’tanat Cease Wyss (Skwxwu7mesh/Sto:Lo//Hawaiian/Swiss). My work spans over two and a half decades, working with artists and communities on projects that utilize technology and community engagement as a means of sharing stories. Web-based works like Picto-Prophecy (2012) – with En’owkin Centre’s Ullus Collective – and public art such as Talking Poles (2009) – Surrey Cultural Capital Art Award – & the Stanley Park Environmental Art Project (2009) all take site specific inspirations and the stories of our past that inform us in the present, while looking towards the future and what part we play in the timeline of our ancestry. Culture and spirituality feed my soul and fuel my creativity. Throughout my life I have been training my spirit to reconnect to my ancestors and bring the stories back to my family and community that we lost through colonization and the Residential Schools. Whether I bring communities together through interactivity like geocaching games or building food security programs the art I engage in plays a significant role.

Hans Winkler (b. 1955) is an artist and curator who lives and works in Berlin and New York. Since 1999, he has been Visiting Artist and Lecturer at the San Francisco Art Institute. Winkler’s art projects include “The Escape of the Iceman/Ötzi” (2008) in collaboration with the Department of Archaeology at EURAC, Bolzano and the Museum of Modern Art; “Held Saga” (2005) at Adademie der Kuenste, Berlin. Recently co-curated exhibitions include “California Conceptual Art” (2010) with Paul Kos and Tony Labat at ar/ge kunst in Bolzano, Italy; and “legal/illegal” (2004) with Helen Adkins and Kai Bauer at NGBK, Berlin.

> link to Facebook event

> link to write-up on Media Democracy Project, written by Sydney Ball

 

Spark: A Fireside Artist Talk feat. Larissa Healey

Thursday, March 17, 2016
Native Education College
285 East 5th Avenue
12:15 – 1:00 pm

Larissa Healey-1

grunt gallery presents Spark: Fireside Artist Talks at the Native Education College the 3rd Thursday of every month from 12:15 to 1:00 pm.

This informal lunchtime talk is hosted by a series of artists who push at the boundaries of the traditional and the contemporary. How do their creations offer insight into broader issues that Indigenous people are faced with in the world today? What sorts of barriers or challenges exist for these artists? What strategies do they use to overcome these challenges?

OPEN TO THE PUBLIC

This recurring event is always FREE, and all are welcome to attend. Bring your own lunch or purchase from the NEC’s small canteen.

Artist Bio:

Larissa Healey (aka Gurl23) is an Ojibway mural artist and an inspirational leader for street youth drop-in cultural programs like the Museum of Anthropology’s Native Youth Program, one of Canada’s longest running First Nations programs.

Larissa’s artwork has been seen at The Vancouver Art Gallery, The Bill Reid Gallery, Power Plant Gallery, The National Gallery of Canada and The Museum of Anthropology, to name a few.  You might also recognize her work from underneath the Granville Street Bridge at the entrance to Granville Island, among many other places.

> link to Facebook event

Spark: A Fireside Artist Talk feat. Mark Igloliorte

February 18, 2016
Native Education College
285 East 5th Avenue
12:15 – 1:00 pm

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grunt gallery presents Spark: Fireside Artist Talks at the Native Education College the 3rd Thursday of every month from 12:15 to 1:00 pm.

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Mark Igloliorte, our featured speaker for February, is an artist who was born in Corner Brook, Newfoundland and grew up in Happy Valley-Goose Bay, Labrador. His artistic work is primarily painting and drawing. He has exhibited in group and solo shows across Canada.

Recently, Igloliorte has participated in national and international exhibitions such as Beat Nation, Vancouver Art Gallery, Vancouver, BC; Le Nouveau Pleinairisme, Musée national des beaux-arts du Québec, Québec, QC; drift, (Solo), curator Ryan Rice, The Toronto Free Gallery, Toronto, ON; and The Québec Triennial 2011: The Work Ahead of Us, Musée d’art contemporain de Montréal, Montréal QC.

He has been the recipient of a number of awards and grants including the Lillian Vineberg Award in Painting and Drawing, The Newfoundland and Labrador Arts Council Visual Arts Grant, and a Canada Council for the Arts Emerging Artist Grant. Igloliorte is represented by Gallerie Donald Browne.

As an Inuk, Igloliorte’s work draws from his Labradorian background and communities of Happy Valley-Goose Bay and Hopedale. He has been recognized as a Labrador Inuit Role Model by the Nunatsiavut Government. In the summer of 2008 and 2009 he worked with several groups of Inuit Youth delivering painting and drawing workshops funded in part by The National Aboriginal Youth Suicide Prevention Strategy (NAYSPS).

He holds both a Bachelor of Education (Intermediate/Secondary) from Memorial University of Newfoundland and a Bachelor of Fine Art, Major in Fine Art from the Nova Scotia College of Art and Design and a Master’s of Fine Art, Studio Art – Painting and Drawing from Concordia University School of Graduate Studies.

Igloliorte is an Assistant Professor at Emily Carr University of Art and Design.

 

> Mark’s website: markigloliorte.net

> See images from Mark’s recent exhibition, Diptychs, at grunt gallery.

> Read an article about Mark and his works in BeatRoute.

 

 

 

 

Spark: A Fireside Artist Talk feat. Osvaldo Ramirez Castillo

January 21, 2106
Native Education College
285 East 5th Avenue
12:15 – 1:00 pm

osvaldo image

Vancouver-based artist Osvaldo Ramirez Castillo explores issues around collective memory, historical trauma, and cultural identity in relation to the violence that occurred against civilians during the 12-year Civil War in El Salvador.

A series of mixed media drawings depict surreal and vibrant scenes filled with creatures in uniform; fragmented bodies tense with sinew and muscle; and carefully drawn figures with faces partially obscured or obliterated. Iconography sourced from North American vernacular culture, Pre-Columbian mythology, and Salvadoran popular folklore is amalgamated to explore the role of non-linear storytelling expressed in mythic form.

Artist Bio:

Born in El Salvador, Castillo immigrated to Canada in 1989 at the age of 11. He attended the Ontario College of Art and Design (Toronto 1998-2001) and received an MFA from Concordia University (2004-2007). A previous resident of Montreal, Castillo relocated to Vancouver in 2013.

 

> See more images from Osvaldo’s exhibition Catastrophe, Memory, Reconciliation.

> Read a brief article about Catastrophe, Memory, Reconciliation.

 

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