30th Anniversary videos from grunt’s archiveLong time archives volunteer Alex Pimm has curated a…

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30th Anniversary videos from grunt’s archive

Long time archives volunteer Alex Pimm has curated a selection of videos from our archive to celebrate grunt’s 30th anniversary. Check out the trailer for Neil Eustache’s Indian Art for Sale below and watch the full videos here:

http://grunt30th.tumblr.com/


Comments Off on 30th Anniversary videos from grunt’s archiveLong time archives volunteer Alex Pimm has curated a…

30th Anniversary videos from grunt’s archiveLong time archives volunteer Alex Pimm has curated a…

image

30th Anniversary videos from grunt’s archive

Long time archives volunteer Alex Pimm has curated a selection of videos from our archive to celebrate grunt’s 30th anniversary. Check out the trailer for Neil Eustache’s Indian Art for Sale below and watch the full videos here:

http://grunt30th.tumblr.com/


Comments Off on 30th Anniversary videos from grunt’s archiveLong time archives volunteer Alex Pimm has curated a…

“On this day in…” November 14th 2004 Laurie…



“On this day in…”

November 14th 2004

Laurie Anderson’s - The End of the Moon

The End of the Moon, [Laurie Anderson’s] new and still- evolving solo show, is about many things, among them NASA, dogs, tress, and travel.  But one of its most obvious topics is the Unites States of America: when Anderson says, ‘When you look at something this big and this broken how do you imagine putting it back together?’  she’s not just talking about the wreckage of the space shuttle Columbia.
In this performance, she offers no easy answers, revealing instead that even teh good things in life are fraught with peril.  Discussing a 10-day retreat she took on the Northern California coast, she describes hiking with her dog Lolabelle and being stalked by vultures hoping to chow down on the terrier.  For the rest of the trip, her pet walked nervously, its head in the air- just like the post-9/11 residents of Anderson’s home city, New York.  Death from above, she posits, has become a constant waking nightmare.” (Alexander Varty - Georgia Straight - November 18 2004)

Check out Archer Pechawis’ interview with Laurie Anderson from Brunt 2007/2008.

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“On this day in…” February 9, 2001 On this…



“On this day in…”

February 9, 2001

On this day in 2001, artist Alberto Friggo staged a performance in which the audience interacted with a recording he had previously made, which was in turn recorded, to be exhibited alongside the original at a later date.

As the title, Gnocchi, suggests, Friggo made a video recording of himself preparing a pot of the potato-based Italian specialty. Then, as the audience consumes what he produced, they watch the recording of the pasta being prepared. This reaction is itself recorded, thus forming the work’s final iteration: the two videos being played alongside each other. 

Exploring consumption, spectatorship, and the reaction of the subject to being observed, this work is a continuation of Friggo’s exploration of performance art, video art, and the possible interactions between the two.

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An Image On An Image: A conversation with Marcus Bowcott [ATA article]

A raw steak must be among the least likely of things you’d expect to find in a cardboard box of papers. But that’s exactly what myself and another volunteer found, to our surprise, during an afternoon of work on grunt’s archive a couple of weeks ago. We discovered that the uncannily realistic-looking steak had formed part of a mid-nineties grunt exhibition called Palimpsest, and when the artist behind it, Marcus Bowcott, happened to stop in a few days later, it seemed only natural to catch up with him to discuss his art, personal philosophy, and what he’s doing now.

I took a rainy-day journey out to visit the artist in his studio in peaceful North Vancouver – a town that Bowcott’s long-time partner, Helene, describes as a “bedroom community, separated from agriculture, industry, entertainment”– an exemplification of the separation in the modern world of the facets of our lives, the way in which we work, eat, play and sleep in locations far removed from one another.

The modernization of the human experience is clearly something of combined terror and fascination to Bowcott. As we sipped on tea provided by Helene, who Bowcott describes as “a partner, in so many ways, in developing my work,” the artist described to me a recent trip down to Seattle, during which he was struck by “just the number of cars on the highway… The automobile is gobbling up energy.”

The automobile, in its used-up state as compacted refuse, has been a recurring theme in Bowcott’s work for some time. The painting exhibited at Bowcott’s grad show from London’s Royal College of Art featured wrecked and compacted cars, and since then, he’s explored the theme in sculpture, notably in a piece, 25 Standard Stoppages, currently being featured at Seattle’s Punch Gallery as part of a show, curated by Rock Hushka, titled Whither the American Dream?. He’s also developing a massively scaled-up version of the sculpture for Vancouver’s upcoming Sculpture Biennale, although, as he wryly comments, “people don’t want to show wrecked cars.”

“The bull doesn’t look that big here [in the photo] but he was 1200 pounds, and the whole gallery became like a manger… There were tons of people packed in there, but all of a sudden you’re honoring this animal, something that is often considered to be below us.”

The wrecked cars in question provide Bowcott with a vehicle to examine modern industry and its often unexamined aftermath. He titled a handful of these sculptures Das Kapital, which he explains as “a reference to our surplus capital, our surplus value/goods…which I’m presenting here as wrecked cars”, a leftover of the industrial process upon which most of us will never lay our eyes.

Another, perhaps more tragic, forgotten leftover of the industrial process was featured in Bowcott’s Palimpsest, the show that, years later, would inspire this article. Something amazing was accomplished in addition to the hyper-realistic steak sculptures and paintings of packaged steaks: for one night, the gallery was emptied of breakable artworks, and a live bull was brought in to inhabit the space. Marcus and Helene evocatively described what it was like to experience such a surreal coming-together of incongruities –

“The bull doesn’t look that big here [in the photo] but he was 1200 pounds, and the whole gallery became like a manger… There were tons of people packed in there, but all of a sudden you’re honoring this animal, something that is often considered to be below us. The cave painting [which was projected onto the bull’s body as part of the show] had much to do with feeding people. They were honoring the animal…and today we just shop for meat. We all had to be really quiet to keep it calm; that kind of hush was a really interesting addition to the installation and performance.”

“We live atomized lives,” Helene continues. “With technology, people become more and more isolated from each other. The same thing happens with food production. In many different aspects of our life…we are becoming more and more specialized.”

A critique or exploration of that atomization could be seen to run through Bowcott’s work as a unifying thread, perhaps in a sense of superimposition, of “stacking, or layering,” Helene tells me. “Even Palimpsest, the word, has to do with layering… An image on an image,” she says. A cave painting projected on the side of a bull. Crushed cars on top of cars on top of cars.

Visit Marcus Bowcott’s website.


About Genevieve Michaels:


Genevieve is studying art history and creative writing at the University of British Columbia. She has been volunteering at grunt since last October, writing and assisting with maintenance and digitization of the archives. She also writes about music and city life for local magazine Beatroute BC. Follow her on twitter: @LavenderIndigo0

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When the term First Nations Art, or Aboriginal Art is mentioned,…



When the term First Nations Art, or Aboriginal Art is mentioned, it seems that we have become used to associating them with totem poles, mythical animals and imagery that is very rooted to an imagined past. The archive project goes beyond this limited view of aboriginal artistic practices and highlights First Nations artists that pioneered the way in which art can act as the locus for intersecting media, including theory, digital work and performance. This website focuses on Ahasiw Maskegon-Iskwew’s prolific practice

"This site features a comprehensive look at the work of Ahasiw Maskegon-Iskwew. Ahasiw was a theorist, curator, writer, new media practitioner and performance artist. He worked in artist run centres in Vancouver, Regina and Winnipeg curating and producing new practices in performance and new media. Ahasiw passed away in 2006. Ghostkeeper features writing, images, websites and performance documentation of Maskegon-Iskwew’s work as well as essays by other curators and producers on his work." (From the Ghostkeeper Website)

For any comments or questions regarding the project or any of the websites being launched, please send us a question, follow us on twitter @gruntgallery or use the gruntArchive tag. You can also take a look  at grunt’s history via facebook timeline.

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How can new forms of expression interact with the issues that…



How can new forms of expression interact with the issues that still plague Aboriginal peoples in North America? How can this dialogue be opened up and discussed within an artistic context? In 2002 grunt gallery took up these types of questions with a groundbreaking conference. With the archives you can explore the topics raised by participating artists, topics that are still far from irrelevant and require us to be critical of our own histories. 

"This site is an Indian Act in and of itself-a chance to continue the heart journey that was the original Indian Acts: Aboriginal Performance Art conference (grunt gallery 2002), and carry that heart to others who could not attend the conference, but whose own hearts may be ignited by this archive and who can witness this conference through the material within this site."

For any comments or questions regarding the project or any of the websites being launched, please send us a question, follow us on twitter @gruntgallery or use the gruntArchive tag. You can also take a look  at grunt’s history via facebook timeline.

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Archives Officially Launched-Performance

As promised, click on the above picture to access grunt gallery’s Performance archive. The website “features a curatorial focus on a variety of performance based works that have been developed at grunt since its inception in 1984." As well as acting as the digital record of the gallery’s own history with the performance art world, the website  concentrates on historically marginalized groups and artists, situating these performances within a larger social, political and artistic discourse. We greatly appreciate your support!

For any comments or questions regarding the project or any of the websites being launched, feel free to send us a question, follow us on twitter @gruntgallery or use the gruntArchive tag.

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