Mount Pleasant Urban Screen Announcement

MPUS Newsletter
New Urban Media Screen to launch in July 2018 in the Mount Pleasant Community!

grunt gallery has been given the reins to program content on a new non-commercial urban screen in Mount Pleasant. The urban screen is being constructed on the second floor of the Rize building on the western side of Kingsway Avenue facing the street. The Mount Pleasant Urban Screen will launch in July 2018.
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From the Archives February 3rd 1987Sammy Sammy: Funkie: The…



From the Archives 

February 3rd 1987

Sammy Sammy: Funkie: The Legend of Hornby Island

I’m a rambler, I’m a gambler, I’m far away from home

If the people don’t like me they can leave me along

I eat when I’m hungry and drink when I’m dry

If the whiskey don’t kill me I will live till I die


At the age of seventy I was still a terror,

Still a live wire that began to know fame,

And my motor still runs with whiskey,

Though some nitwits think me insane.

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From the ArchivesJuly 16 1996Laiwan: Small, Medium and Not…



From the Archives

July 16 1996

Laiwan: Small, Medium and Not Large: Books and Collages

 “This exhibition traces the various strategies Laiwan has chosen over the years (from 1982 to present) in her investigation of categorized identity. These works don’t posit right/wrong, us/them dichotomies, nor do they get washed away in liberal post-modern ambiguities. Using language as a primary source of engagement, Laiwan draws the viewer into a position that only self examination of our own “uniqueness” and sense of moral responsibility can complete. With just ourselves to consider, these art works become powerful reminders of the limits of our constructed perceptions.” (Brice Canyon, July 1996)

“I like the media of books and print as they convey ideas succinctly and intimately while being less intrusive to the ideas they contain. Perhaps it is because we have been with books for many generations that we are used to them and their intrusion.” (Artist’s Statement, Small, Medium and Not Large: Books and Collages, 1996)

“Laiwan’s use of the multiple enables her to situate works within the context of living social relations - the everyday, public space, personal space. The realms of production (technological and commercial) embodied in many of them point in the direction of institutional critique. Recognizing this made me aware of the subversive potential of works such as these, their ability to function outside of the institutional framework in a socially and politically engaged manner. Technically there appears to be nothing new or original about how the works are made; specialized skill and technical mastery are not an issue, though there is an explicit refusal of mastery involved. However, her works often play off of their technological means of production; ‘content’ is intimately bound to ‘form’, forms that are often taken from daily life.” (Jack Stanley, tapping silences from Laiwan: livres et collages, 1998)

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From the ArchivesFebruary 17 1987Paul McDonald: Ornamental…











From the Archives

February 17 1987

Paul McDonald: Ornamental Renegade

“McDonald’s craft responds to the need for humanistic furnishings in a high-tech age and echoes a frustration at modern, mass-produced furniture. Each piece is finished by hand, each is individual.” (grunt press release, 1987)

“Paint is usually the main ingredient in McDonald’s surface designs, but it is often combined with other substances to achieve the effect he is looking for. He won’t reveal the formula that he uses to create certain finishes, such as the textured stone surface of a long table and mirror frame featured in the show. But he would reveal one bizarre list of ingredients he hit upon for gold trim that has the metallic lustre of gold leaf, used on a table by Vancouver furniture designer Francis Lemieux. It’s a combination of powdered bronze, gum arabic, and honey.” (The Vancouver Sun, February 20, 1987)

“In this show, there will be groups of objects in fictional historical setting - i.e. Mesopotamia, Ur, Byzantine, etc. Not period pieces or replicas of bygone eras, but statements about what these cultures might have been, or what they can signify about our perceptions of the past and present.” (Artist’s Statement, Ornamental Renegade, 1987)

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From the ArchivesFebruary 17 1987Paul McDonald: Ornamental…











From the Archives

February 17 1987

Paul McDonald: Ornamental Renegade

“McDonald’s craft responds to the need for humanistic furnishings in a high-tech age and echoes a frustration at modern, mass-produced furniture. Each piece is finished by hand, each is individual.” (grunt press release, 1987)

“Paint is usually the main ingredient in McDonald’s surface designs, but it is often combined with other substances to achieve the effect he is looking for. He won’t reveal the formula that he uses to create certain finishes, such as the textured stone surface of a long table and mirror frame featured in the show. But he would reveal one bizarre list of ingredients he hit upon for gold trim that has the metallic lustre of gold leaf, used on a table by Vancouver furniture designer Francis Lemieux. It’s a combination of powdered bronze, gum arabic, and honey.” (The Vancouver Sun, February 20, 1987)

“In this show, there will be groups of objects in fictional historical setting - i.e. Mesopotamia, Ur, Byzantine, etc. Not period pieces or replicas of bygone eras, but statements about what these cultures might have been, or what they can signify about our perceptions of the past and present.” (Artist’s Statement, Ornamental Renegade, 1987)

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“On this day in…”February 13 1990Mike…







“On this day in…”

February 13 1990

Mike MacDonald’s 7 Photographic Works

“MacDonald’s work has covered environmental issues and native people for many years and this exhibition of seven photographic works continues in this tradition. The works deal with totem poles and sustainability. Using mirror or reverse printing and multiple shots of a single pole gives the works a wider dimension. The works in this exhibition are from the Gitksan territory near Hazelton and are among the oldest still standing in their original environment.” (grunt, 1990)

“His extensive knowledge of Northwest Coast Indian Art and Indian Music nudge his filming instincts. He has experimented with rock video, especially with Vancouver punk rock group D.O.A. He is interested in recycling, incorporating the concept into his lifestyle and work. Mutual concern has resulted in video tapes with Vancouver recycle artist Evelyn Roth.” (The Hazelton Sentinel, 1986)

“Being an environmentalist has become more fashionable than disco once was. I’ve stepped away from working with environmental groups. I feel I accomplish more working on my own than working with the groups. I have a lot of problems with what I call sob-sister ecology. If my ancestors hadn’t eaten seals I wouldn’t be here.” (Mike MacDonald from an interview with Tom Sherman for Mercer Union, 1991)

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Charlene Vickers and the Cat’s Meow. [Fridge Magnates]


As any owner of an urban cat will tell you, those cats get BORED. They have toys, they disdain them. You try to play with them and they yawn in the most discouraging fashion. That’s why I was so impressed by Charlene’s Cat’s Meow, you know, that awesome cat toy you’ve seen advertised on tv and often wondered about. Could it be the answer to chronic urban cat boredom?

I popped over to Charlene’s in the middle of the summer heat wave, record setting number of days with hotness and no precipitation. It was the perfect temperature for staring into the fridge, opening the door and sitting in there, or perhaps using it as a storage compartment for your unmentionables.

Once again, I failed to find the jumbo carrots and long English cucumbers that set my heart aflame when I look into a person’s fridge. Sigh….. I feel that sometimes people do not consider my needs at all when they are stocking up in preparation for our visit. I did however find quite a fascinating number of condiments and some delicious- looking chocolatey items.

Charlene is a fairly recent addition to the good-natured grunt Board of Directors. It’s been about a year since Glenn popped the question and asked her to join up. She is a multi-talented artist, whose work includes painting, sculpture and performance art. She was working on finishing up her MFA at SFU when I visited but still managed to find time do the cooking around her place. I so admire people who cook, and I suppose it does explain their need to stock the fridge with something other than entirely phallic vegetables as I am prone to do.[some food pic here]
I did not manage to pry too many juicy, gossipy details out of Charlene, despite revealing endless fascinating tidbits about myself.

She admitted to a fondness for Cheezies, but not to any lurid scandals or anything. I was so overheated that day, I forgot to ask if she preferred the Styrofoam-y type, or the hard crunchers. (Personally, I like the Styrofoam-y ones, if anyone cares at all…….or wishes to get me a little snack or anything.)

Mostly, we chatted about the Cat’s Meow, and the general happiness of her cats. Charlene was as patient and pleasant as all the grunt directors have proven to be, and not at all shy about sharing her fridge secrets. My visit with her resulted in the purchase of a Cat’s Meow for my cat, who loves it so much, she sleeps on top of it every day!

Refreshment Rating for this visit: **** What could be better than an icy cold glass of water on a boiling hot day? Well, a small cookie or two might liven things up, but I am never one to complain.

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“On this day in…”December 6 1988 – Gary…











"On this day in…"
December 6 1988 - Gary Ross’ Animate Objects


Garry Ross’ objects are easy to dismiss.  As objects of contemplation each piece waits quietly for the discovery that effects transformation in both viewer and object.  Many of the pieces start as objects culled from industrial sites.  Often they are machine parts, patters  or hardware with a function originating in urban industrial sites.  Most wear the scars of their former life prominently.  Often they are machine parts, patterns or hardware with a function originating in urban industrial culture.  They are old and for the most part obsolete.

By changing the context in which the object is seen, the former use is nullified, and takes on a transformed meaning.  The manipulation of meaning through contextual change and the use of the found manufactured object has been a major direction of consumer and manmade elements into the realm of art.  Ross subtly alters these elements by transforming the mechanical into a pastoral where they become like a river or a mountain and the contemplation of which brings forth a multiplicity of meanings which speak to the metaphysical.” (grunt)

- AM

 

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