After Hours – Photo Exhibit @ Mainspace




CAPIC (Canadian Association of Professional Image Creators) presents- “After Hours”- a photo exhibit showcasing what professional commercial photographers enjoy photographing during their own personal time. A juried exhibit for our members with the mandate: What is your secret passion? What is it you  photograph when you are free to photograph whatever you want?

Organizations Mandate
CAPIC Vancouver is a chapter of the National organization that is the collective voice and advocate for professional photographers, illustrators and digital artists
in Canada. We work hard to maintain industry standards, create a community, fight for copyright protection, and much more. Our work helps all the professionals in our industry. As a professional association, CAPIC’s mission is to promote quality and creativity as well as good business practices. CAPIC continues it’s efforts to support image creators through the creation of resources such as fee schedules and business practice surveys which are designed as a necessary reference for any Illustrator or Photographer getting started in the Industry.

Name and Address of Venue
Mainspace Gallery
350 East 2nd Ave, Vancouver, BC

Date and Time
Opening Reception is April 9 from 7-10 pm the the show will be open 12-5 April
10, 11, 12. please enter through the grunt gallery next door.

This exhibition coincides with Eraser Street by Henri Robideau at grunt gallery. 

Organization or Event website
www.capic.org
www.facebook.com/capicvancouver

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Vancouver Art Review: Part 1: “Mainstreeters: Taking Advantage 1972-1982” curated by Allison Collins and Michael Turner

Written by David McLeish, posted on Vancouver Art Review.

Finding the right way to discuss the show currently on at Satellite Gallery, “Mainstreeters: Taking Advantage 1972-1982” has been difficult. I’ve opted to split my review into two parts, the first part dealing with individual works, the second part offering broader reflections. It seemed reasonable to devote two reviews to this show, as it is clearly a major, multi-party undertaking whose contents require and deserve sustained engagement. Still, this review is much longer than I intended.

First, some background. The Mainstreeters (Kenneth Fletcher, Deborah Fong, Carol Hackett, Marlene MacGregor, Annastacia McDonald, Charles Rea, Jeanette Reinhardt and Paul Wong) were a self-described “art gang” who grew up around Main Street in Vancouver’s Mount Pleasant neighbourhood. They became friends in high school and, during the decade covered by the exhibit, they were active participants in Vancouver’s art scene. They worked mainly in video and performance. They also led art workshops, hosted “drag balls,” and dabbled in fashion modeling. Paul Wong and Charles Rea went on to have solo careers as artists, while other members pursued other paths.

[Read the entire review here]

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Drag Ball

After a 30-year hiatus, the legendary Mainstreeters Dragball that transformed Mt. Pleasant is back, featuring Vancouver’s best drag queens, DJs, performers, and Vera Wong as the outrageous Mistress of Ceremonies. Co-presented by The Grunt Gallery.

The Mainstreeters
From 1977 to 1985, the Mainstreeters’ Dragballs began as intimate studio events, developing into elaborate art parties with spectacular décor, performances, and DJs. Shaping an important chapter in Vancouver’s history, the Mainstreeters were an “art gang” of East Van rebels who were fearlessly open about their work, sexualities, and lifestyles, helping to build a Warhol Factory-like scene that still resonates today. This month’s dragball will be a showstopping night of old and new-school gender-bending drag queens, kings, and everything in between. There will be special performances, homages, and awards for Best in Drag—the perfect opportunity to finally express your “other” self and take it to the next level
takingadvantage.ca

House rules: Come in drag, or not at all! Bring out your creative best.

Performers: Vera Wang, Maria Toilette, Badkitty Lulu, Dairy Queens, Edward Malaprop, Jane Smoker, and Berlin Stiller.
DJs: HEAVEN record-spinners Trevor Risk & Patrick Campbell.
Visuals by: Paul Wong and Patrick Daggitt.

This event is part of Mainstreeters: Taking Advantage, on view at the Satellite Gallery until Mar 14, 2015.

Saturday, March 7th.
Fox Cabaret
2321 Main St.
10:30pm-2:00am

Tickets available through Eventbrite.

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FutureLoss

FutureLoss
Zoe Kreye
Project dates: January 1st – April 30th, 2015
Location: grunt gallery and Main Street
Closing event(s): TBC

Is there a corner where you can feel the change?
Hold this heavy until the weight grows warm.
Is this how we create an artifact we can preserve?

Vancouver-based artist Zoe Kreye interprets sculptural incarnations of loss, here on Main Street. Over the course of 12 weeks, the artist will engage directly with shopowners, organizers and residents in discussions around what it means to hold space in a shifting landscape. Space, on this strip and in this city, is currency, and Kreye’s practice reaches through the overarching narratives of real estate, gentrification and speculation to consider the poetics of an individual’s connection to place. What bodies exist here? What corners? And in between these – what would the loss of one or the other look like?

Kreye’s practice quietly inhabits the street: she will meet with participants in their own spaces, and work with them to create discrete objects and impressions in plaster. These works–abstract, raw, wrinkled, angular– will be combined to form a collective sculptural utterance, a statement from the community that is both abstract and earnest. Not quite documentary, but certainly infused with real bodies and things, FutureLoss is an evolving portrait of this neighbourhood, and this moment in time.

For updates, and to see the work in process, please visit futureloss.ca

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Al Neil and Carole Itter’s Cabin: grunt gallery Field Trip

grunt gallery decided to take a field trip to Cate’s Cove to visit Al Neil and Carole Itter’s cabin. Other than Glenn, most of the staff had never visited the little shack located off the water. We first stopped at the bird sanctuary where Ken Lum’s from shangri-la to shangri-la is installed, despite the woods dwarfing the size of the shacks, they are bigger than one might think. By the way, one of these shacks reference Tom Burrows old cabin, he currently has an exhibition at the Belkin.

We then continued up the road to Cate’s Park where Glenn Alteen guided us down a little known path towards the cabin.

Considering all of the media attention the cabin has received recently and the efforts from Glenn and the gang at grunt to help increase much needed attention about this amazing piece of history, it was really important for all of the staff to actually visit the site and get a feeling of what that area was all about.

This is a sort of evolving sculpture, apparently when the King Tide occurred in December, the water rose to the platform of the cabin but luckily pieces from this work remained intact.

The cabin is a single room and it’s heated by a wood stove, it’s entirely made of wood and includes a small kitchen, a living room area, a piano and a bedroom space at the far end.

If you want to keep up with what’s happening with the cabin, ‘like’ the Facebook page here.

You can view the entire photo album here, or simply toggle one of the above photos and click the arrows.

 

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Vancouver Sun: Artists fight to preserve historic, 80-year-old North Vancouver cabin

Photo from the Vancouver Sun Article | Vancouver artist and jazz musician Al Neil has been occupying a cabin by the waterfront in North Vancouver for decades. The cabin is slated to be removed by Jan. 31 to make way for property development.
Photograph by: Jenelle Schneider, SUN. See all here.


“For over 150 years squatters — artists, sailors who had jumped ship, bohemians and people unable or unwilling to pay rent — have made improvised homes for themselves along the shores of the Fraser River, Vancouver Harbour and Burrard Inlet.

Many were simply looking for a place to live, but others, including novelist Malcolm Lowry, poets Earle Birney, Dorothy Livesay, and Al Purdy and whale expert and Greenpeace founder Paul Spong used their homes as sites for important creative work.

More recently photographer Stan Douglas and visual artist Ken Lum have created works based on the homes of artists on the Burrard Inlet foreshore.

Now, the last surviving example of the unofficial residences on Burrard Inlet — a cabin near Cates Park on the North Shore that has served artistic collaborators Al Neil and Carole Itter variously as a residence and an artist’s workshop for decades — is under threat. Neil and Itter still use and maintain the one-room cabin, which has no plumbing and appears to be in sound condition.”

Read the full article.

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Globe & Mail Article: Vancouver artists fight to protect a colourful piece of the city’s art history

Photo Credit: Jim Jardine, 1989

“Ms. Itter, 75, is slowly emptying the cabin where she and Al Neil have been making art and music for decades. They received an eviction notice from Port Metro Vancouver in the fall with a Jan. 31 deadline to vacate, and a demolition permit has been issued for Feb. 1.”

“Now a number of prominent players on the local art scene are working to save the little cabin that tells a big story about Vancouver’s history.

The waterfront area was once home to a number of squatters – many of whom were artists, including the author Malcolm Lowry. He lived in a series of shacks in what is now Cates Park, where he wrote much of his classic Under the Volcano. The nearby cabin that has been home and studio to Mr. Neil and Ms. Itter is believed to have been made in Coal Harbour by a Scandinavian craftsman in the 1930s.

Mr. Neil, now 90 – a musician, composer and visual artist who received the Lifetime Achievement Award at the Vancouver Mayor’s Arts Award last year – has lived in the cabin on and off since 1966, serving as a sort of beach watchman for the company next door, McKenzie Barge. He initially paid rent to the shipyard – $15 a month, “and then eventually they said don’t bother,” says Ms. Itter, a sculptor and writer who joined Mr. Neil 13 years after he moved in.”

“’We live in such a redevelopment city and there’s so little of heritage that gets saved here and I think this is a very important piece of Vancouver heritage that we should all really think about before we let it go,’ says Glenn Alteen with the Grunt Gallery.”

Read the entire article here.

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MAINSTREETERS events: January – March

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MAINSTREETERS: Taking Advantage, 1972–1982 exhibition is at Satallite Gallery. Read more.

During the exhibition, Main Street Tapes will be show in storefronts along Main Street, including:
Eugene Choo, 3683 Main Street
Smoking Lily, 3634 Main Street
Lifetime Collective, 4386 Main Street

Performance of Kenneth Fletcher’s Camp Potlatch
Directed by Paul Wong
Thursday January 22 at 8pm
Location: Satellite Gallery

Exhibition Tour and Conversation with Allison Collins and Michael Turner
Saturday, January 31 at 2pm
Location: Satellite Gallery

Main Street Walking Tour with Paul Wong and Annastacia McDonald
Saturday, February 21 at 2pm
Meeting point: Helen’s Grill, 4102 Main Street

Drag Ball
Saturday, March 7
Location: Fox Cabaret, 2321 Main Street

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