Three Indigenous Project Sites

grunt gallery wishes you a happy Aboriginal Day!

grunt has a rich history of working with indigenous artists, check out some of these project sites that archive text, images, video and more.

1) Indian Acts: Aboriginal Performance Art
A website that grunt gallery curated for Activating the Archives, it chronicles a performance art conference that took place in Vancouver in 2002.
Check out essay’s written by Tania Willard, Dana Claxton, Daina Warren, Archer Pechawis and more…

 

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2) Nikamon Ohci Askiy (songs because of the land)

In December 2008, artist Cheryl L’Hirondelle made daily journeys throughout Vancouver and “sung” the landscape she encountered. These encounters were captured by mobile phone by the artist and whatever other technologies are made available by participating viewers/audience (video, photo, audio). Check out this interactive website that includes sound bites from L’Hirondelle’s recordings.

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3) Beat Nation

The little exhibition that could. Some might not realize the humble beginnings of Beat Nation and how it began as a youth project website between grunt gallery and Native Youth Artist Collective. Check out the website that was originally created in 2009, the amount of emerging artists who have since built tremendous careers is inspiring.

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Check out all of grunt’s project websites here.

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SHAKO CLUB | Bentos and Wellness

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“Today in the Shako Club studio, we went through each of the 60 participant questionnaires. It was a marathon of a process – consisting of several broadsheets all over the table and me at times yelling out things … but we have gotten over the first hurdle of it.  Also today, we finally got our hands on the bento boxes that have just arrived from the wood carver, Minoru Yamamoto’s woodshop. Though he is still diligently making many more – we were were able to start the first batch of coating each of the boxes with a natural wax treatment. Something that is necessary that the maple box can withstand washing and the long term wear and tear…” [ read the entire blog post here].

 

“Cooking your soba noodles right…”

Tips on wellness.


About Shako Club | Visit ShakoClub.com

Shako club is a project initiated by grunt gallery working in collaboration with Tonari Gumi and the Asian Canadian Studies Society. Special thanks to Imagine BC for funding this project.

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Curated Reading Lists via ArcPost

Tarah Hogue Reading List

Click here to read more about Tarah Hogue’s Curated Reading List.

Visit ArcPost to view all of the Curated Reading Lists.


PAARC has collaborated with the grunt gallery, the Or Gallery, VIVO Media Arts Centre, Open Space and Alternator Centre for Contemporary Art to commission curatorial research drawing from the print material indexed in the Repertoire of BC ARCs’ Publications. Lorna Brown, Lucas Glenn, Tarah Hogue, Robin Simpson, and Benjamin Willems were commissioned to produce thematic curated readings lists and accompanying essays highlighting particular moments and orientations specific to BC’s artist-run histories. Through the publication of these reading lists, we hope to stimulate renewed interest in the practices and histories of BC ARCs from the particular perspective of their publishing activities.

 

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Launch: Curated Reading Lists from the Repertoire of BC ARCs’ Publications

[From the ArcPost website]

PAARC has collaborated with the grunt gallery, the Or Gallery, VIVO Media Arts Centre, Open Space and Alternator Centre for Contemporary Art to commission curatorial research drawing from the print material indexed in the Repertoire of BC ARCs’ Publications. Lorna Brown, Lucas Glenn, Tarah Hogue, Robin Simpson, and Benjamin Willems were commissioned to produce thematic curated readings lists and accompanying essays highlighting particular moments and orientations specific to BC’s artist-run histories. Through the publication of these reading lists, we hope to stimulate renewed interest in the practices and histories of BC ARCs from the particular perspective of their publishing activities.

Tarah Hogue, curatorial resident at grunt gallery, has developed a reading list entitled, Indigenous Women Artists in Artist-Run Centres.
Read her essay and list here.

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EVENT:
This Saturday June 6 at 5pm, attend the launch of the Curated Reading Lists from the Repertoire of BC ARCs’ Publications project at VIVO Media Arts Centre.

5 PM: Panel discussion with participating curators
6 PM: PAARC social with refreshments and snacks!

The Pacific Association of Artist Run Centres will launch the Curated Reading Lists from the Repertoire of BC ARCs’ Publications project, realized in collaboration with the grunt gallery, the Or Gallery, VIVO Media Arts Centre, Open Space and Alternator Centre for Contemporary Art.

Project collaborators include:
Lorna Brown (commissioned by the Or Gallery), Lucas Glenn (commissioned by Alternator Centre for Contemporary Art), Tarah Hogue (commissioned by the grunt gallery), Robin Simpson (commissioned by VIVO Media Arts Centre), and Benjamin Willems (commissioned by the Open Space). These curators have been commissioned by partner organizations to produce thematic curated readings lists and accompanying essays highlighting particular moments and orientations specific to BC’s artist-run histories.

Curated Reading Lists can be found on ArcPost.

Facebook Event info.

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New Project: Shako Club

Shako Club
Artist: Cindy Mochizuki
Residency Dates: May 1st – July 31st

Grunt gallery’s 30th anniversary programming continues with a new project by Vancouver-based artist Cindy Mochizuki.

Shako club (or social club) is a project initiated by grunt gallery and the artist, and created in collaboration with members of Tonari Gumi (Vancouver’s Japanese Community Volunteers Association), an association serving primarily Japanese Canadian seniors and new immigrants to Canada. With a signature investment in both collaborative and improvisational energies, Mochizuki will spend 3 months in residence at Tonari Gumi, working in their commercial kitchen to create recipes and culinary sculptures that acknowledge equally the influence of cultural background, history, taste, aesthetic value, and an abiding love of snacks.

Through an ongoing series of workshops and taste experiments, Mochizuki and Tonari Gumi members will craft interpretations of the bento box (a traditional Japanese meal set containing a selection of small dishes) that combine culinary and sculptural sensibilities with stories, memories and advice, selected with care.

Mochizuki will document the workshops and process through a series of drawings and recipes available online, and the work will culminate in the distribution of custom-made, edible bento “editions” to members of the public.

For more information on signing up for a bento, read here and fill out the questionnaire.
*Our participant list is now full, all new sign-ups will be placed on our waiting list in case of cancellations.*

Shako club is a project initiated by grunt gallery working in collaboration with Tonari Gumi and the Asian Canadian Studies Society. Special thanks to Imagine BC for funding this project.

Read a conversation with grunt gallery’s Curator of Community Engagement Vanessa Kwan and Cindy Mochizuki: http://ow.ly/O6b5L

 

Follow this project, and read up on recipes and advice at shakoclub.com

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Japanese Translation:

About the Project: PressRelease Japanese | Fill out the questionnaire.


About the 30th Anniversary
Grunt gallery’s 30th anniversary year is about revisiting histories and acknowledging the unique mix of influences that have shaped us as an institution. The social life of our neighbourhood figures large, and this year we feature projects that extend into the community, and artists who work in and through the networks of relationships surrounding us. Previous projects have included Kitchen by Julia Feyrer, FutureLoss by Zoe Kreye, artist editions by Sonny Assu and Lorna Brown, and an ongoing series of events, publications, discussions and screenings.

Art is social. For more on grunt’s 30th anniversary, and the future, visit grunt.ca.

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FutureLoss – Artist Statement

 

How do we experience change? How do we understand loss? What techniques do we have for digesting these emotions?

I lost my mother 2 years ago and have been struck with how intense the physical experience of loss has been. I actually feel the physical void of her standing next to me or holding my hand. This ache surprised me and invited me to discover how I might fill this void and quench this physical longing.

In the last 30 years Main St. has transformed. Shopkeepers see it as the strip that divides east and west Vancouver, while remaining firmly rooted in the east. They remember it as a working class neighbourhood with practical shops for home repairs, families, fast food and light industrial activities. They have seen many shops close or go upscale and had friends disappear to more affordable boroughs. When I asked them to consider their own future loss, some had a palpable fear attached to rising rents and gentrification while others were nostalgic of their own aging, having grown up on Main Street with their shop.

When we walk down our street and recall the shops that once were and the friends that inhabited them, do these memories move beyond our minds? Do they take up lodging in our bones, in our flesh?  Are they part of our muscle memory? I wondered: does the body long for known and well worn places? Does it crave the bodily repetition of opening the door each day, turning on the neon sign, trimming the flowers, closing the till, cutting the fabric, wrapping the bread, pushing the mop – remembering how to move and exist within familiar settings?

I began walking up and down Main St. to get in touch with this sensation. I started conversations with shopkeepers, often attracted to the ones who seemed to embody their own shop. Through conversation, recommendation and intuition I asked shopkeepers to join me in an experiment to see if we might be able to find where history and loss were located in their shops and in their own bodies. For the curious and the willing I would later arrive with a kit of powdered plaster, mixing bowls, gloves and plastic. We always began with a conversation to recall their beginnings on Main St., their impressions of the change in the neighbourhood, stories from over the years and the evolution of themselves with their business. Our conversation would evolve into a tour that investigated their space in search of a corner where history might have built up: a floorboard that remained as an artifact of the past, a door knob that felt like a nexus for it all. We always found a spot despite initial reservations that such a spot existed. Together we would press the liquid plaster encased in plastic into the void. We would encourage it to take up space, so that it could receive its impression, recall its shape, capture its essence, hold the sensation and mark its structure.

It was very important to me that we also found a corresponding spot on their own bodies where loss might live by creating a pair of cast plaster bones, twins which hold onto the architecture of our built environment and of our internal bodily worlds. I see this collection as a kind of museum of loss, where one might employ an emotional anthropologist / archaeologist. Do we build museums/gallery/shrines as a way to preserve that which is lost?

Recalling my original impulse, the phantom physical longing for my mother after her death, these bare artifacts try to manifest the intangible so that we can still hold it in our hands. These stark white artifacts are reaching out for each other…

– Zoe Kreye, April 2015

FutureLoss | Website


This project is a part of grunt’s 30th Anniversary.

Learn more here.
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Eraser Street Talk

Exhibition Info | Facebook Event

Visit grunt gallery on Saturday May 9 from 1–4pm for a roundtable on housing and photography in Vancouver. This talk occurs in relation to Henri Robideau’s Eraser Street, currently showing at grunt gallery.

Eraser Street – Hubris, Humility and Humanity in the Making of a City! is an exhibition that mixes Robideau’s newest and oldest photographs of moments, milestones and monuments in Vancouver, tracing the character of the city and its residents during the last 40 years of non-stop growth. The work reflects upon the quality of life in Vancouver, the value of heritage, the economic engine of development, homelessness and the voice of the people. Robideau’s holographic satirical text charts history while critiquing the forces of government and commerce that have had a hand in shaping our urban environment.

Participants in the roundtable include Audrey Siegl, Wendy Pedersen, Lorna Brown, Eugene McCann, Jeff Derksen, Henri Robideau and Clint Burnham. The event will be facilitated by Clint Burnham and is free to the public.

Read the exhibition essay:
Henri Robideau: the Photography of Dispossession
Written by Clint Burnham
http://bit.ly/1J4LCLw

——- Bios: ——-

AUDREY SIEGL (sχłemtəna:t in her ancestral name) is a Musqueam activist. She ran as a candidate for Vancouver city council for COPE in the November, 2014 municipal elections, and was active in supporting the Oppenheimer Park tent city. She lives on traditional Musqueam territory at the mouth of the Fraser River and works with the language and cultural department to revitalize the hən̓q̓əmin̓language. Siegl was also active in the Idle No More movement and in organizing the protection of the c̓əsnaʔəm (Marpole Midden) in 2012.

WENDY PEDERSEN is a well-known community organizer who has lived in the Downtown Eastside for more than twenty years. Formerly involved in the Carnegie Community Action Project, she has been part of protests and organizing of residents around the Pidgin restaurant, the Chinatown Height restrictions, DTES gentrification, the Downtown Eastside Local Area Plan (DLAP), and in support of the Oppenheimer Park tent city.

LORNA BROWN is a Vancouver artist and curator who has been producing work for the past 30 years. Active in the Association for Non-Commercial Culture in the 1980s and ‘90s, she was curator of Artspeak from 1999 to 2004. Her curatorial projects include Set Project, a series of exhibitions, performances, and events focusing on rehearsal and re-enactment in contemporary culture, and she was the project curator for Group Search: art in the library, a series of site-specific artists’ projects in the spaces and systems of the Vancouver Public Library (2006-2008). Brown’s art has been exhibited and collected locally and nationally, and since 2009 she has been on the board of Other Sights, a public art initiative, for whom she co-curated (with Clint Burnham) the Digital Natives project in 2011.

EUGENE MCCANN is an associate professor in the Geography Department at SFU. His research interests focus on urban drug policy, urban policy mobilities, urban development and urban politics, and the relationships between urbanization and globalization. Recent and forthcoming publications include Urban Geography: A Critical Introduction (co-ed. with Jonas, A. E. G., & Thomas, M, Wiley-Blackwell), and, with Miewald, C., “Foodscapes and the Geographies of Poverty: Sustenance, Strategy, and Politics in an Urban Neighborhood” (Antipode, Vol 46, Issue 2).

JEFF DERKSEN is an associate professor in the English Department at SFU. His areas of special interest are national cultures and the role of the state in the era of globalization; cultural imperialism and the politics of aesthetics; the poetry and poetics of globalized cities; the emergent global cultural front; culture and gentrification in global-urban spaces; architecture and urbanism; cultural poetics, cultural studies, and cultural geography. Recent publications include The Vestiges (Talonbooks) and After Euphoria (JRP Ringier/ECUAD).

HENRI ROBIDEAU (henrirobideau.com) is a Vancouver artist and photographer who has been exhibiting locally, nationally, and internationally since 1970. His work has appeared in group and solo exhibitions in Vancouver, Comox, Kelowna, Quebec, York (UK), Washington, Paris, and Mexico City, and is in collections in Houston (Museum of Fine Arts), Ottawa (National Gallery), Seattle (Seattle Art Commission), Surrey (Surrey Art Gallery), Vancouver (Vancouver Art Gallery), and the Canadian Museum of Contemporary Photography, among others.

CLINT BURNHAM teaches in the English Department at Simon Fraser University and has written the catalogue essay “Henri Robideau: the Photography of Dispossession,” which accompanies this exhibition. He is presently writing books on Slavoj Žižek and digital culture and on Fredric Jameson and Wolf of Wall Street. His essays on art have recently been published by the Kunsthalle Wien and on momus.ca. In the winter of 2014-15 he completed a residency with the Urban Subjects collective in Vienna.

——- Exhibition Essay: ——-
Henri Robideau: the Photography of Dispossession
Written by Clint Burnham
http://bit.ly/1J4LCLw

——- Exhibition Info: ——
https://www.facebook.com/events/1018115858216994/

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An Evening in the Archive with Henri Robideau

An Evening in the Archive with Henri Robideau
A Fundraiser for the grunt Archive


Saturday April 25, 2015

at grunt gallery
Drinks at 6:30 pm, Dinner at 7:30 pm
Tickets: $50 | Purchase Tickets here.

You are cordially invited to grunt gallery’s “An Evening in the Archive with Henri Robideau,” a tribute to Henri’s work as a photographer over the past 45 years with special emphasis on his focus on history and the archive. Our fundraising tribute and dinner will coincide with and celebrate Henri’s upcoming exhibition, Eraser Street – Hubris, Humility and Humanity in the Making of a City!, running from April 9 to May 16. Marian Penner Bancroft will speak about Henri’s contributions, as an artist, to Vancouver. Please join us for this special dinner where a selection of digitized videos from our archives, produced for our 30th anniversary, will also be screened.

Over the past five years, grunt gallery has focused on developing its archive and archival projects such as Robideau’s Eraser Street and the recent MAINSTREETERS – Taking Advantage, 1972 – 1982. Since 2010, our special initiative—“Activating the Archives”—has released archival materials in the context of new curatorial projects, commissions, and scholarship, working to create sites such as Ruins in Process–Vancouver Art in the 60’s (2009); ATA – Activating the Archive (2012); Ghostkeeper (2012), celebrating the digital and performance work of Ahasiw Maskegon Iskwew; and Background/ThisPlace (2013).

This fundraiser will focus on grunt gallery’s archival activities and the importance of producing work based in or around archival research. “An Evening in the Archive with Henri Robideau” is  the first of several events highlighting our archive—and other archives—celebrating the work being produced by artists engaged with archives throughout the city.

There will be opportunities to donate to specific programs and projects related to our archive. We look forward to telling you about our upcoming initiatives. grunt’s Archivist, Dan Pon, will be available to present a tour of the archive and share some of his recent initiatives.

For more information contact Karlene Harvey at karlene@grunt.ca

grunt gallery
grunt.ca | 604-875-9516
116 – 350 East 2nd Ave, Vancouver, BC, V5T 4R8

 

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